Freestyle

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Freestyle is theoretically just playing catch with a friend. But when you see a true freestyler, you’ll know the difference, they can do things with the disc you couldn’t even have imagined being possible. Check out the sites listed below for access to video clips. Once you’ve seen how amazing it can look, check out the FPA (Freestyle Players Association) Competition Manual for their rules.  Freestyle is no longer administered under the umbrella of WFDF, but here’s the link to their rules for historical reference.

Here’s a couple of Freestyle links: The Freestyle Frisbee Page and FPA – Freestyle Players Association.

Freestyle Players Association Competition Manual

Updated: April 2008

 

Introduction

Freestyle is creative movement with a flying disc. Competitive freestyle is a sport whereby a player or a team of two or three players perform a routine, which consists of a series of throws, catches and moves, done to music using one or more discs. The routine is compared to the routines of the other competitors through scoring done by judges, who evaluate the routine on the basis of difficulty, execution and artistic impression. The player or team with the best score is declared the winner.

The following procedures are mandatory for the FPA World Championships, FPA Tour Events and tournaments at which the FPA officiates. Exceptions to these procedures may be made by a majority vote of the full FPA Board.

In the case of the FPA World Championships, the US Open or the WFDF Championships, players must be informed of any exceptions no later than 45 days before competition begins.

Players should be informed of exceptions at other tournaments no later than 14 days before competition begins. Exceptions due to inclement weather or emergency are not subject to these deadlines.

Contents:

701. Tournament Facilities

702. Tournament Staffing

703. Event Progressions

704. Seeding and Pools

705. Judging Panels

706. Administration of Competition

707. Judging Responsibilities

708. Player Expectations

709. Judging System

 

701. TOURNAMENT FACILITIES

701.01 Competition Site

 

702. TOURNAMENT STAFFING

The tournament director should ensure that the following responsibilities are covered:

702.01 Head Judge

The Head Judge oversees all categories of competition (Open Pairs, Womens Pairs, Juniors, etc.), makes final determinations on seeding and wild cards, and makes determinations on any player concerns or protests.

702.02 Category Judge

It is sometimes desirable to have a category judge oversee the administration of each category of competition.

702.03 Pool Director

The pool director oversees the administration of one pool of competition. The pool director insures that all judges are seated and ready to evaluate performances, collects scores from judges. The Pool Director works with the timer to insure accurate official timing of routines and works with the statistician to tabulate scores.

702.04 Sound Director

The sound director collects music from teams and plays music for teams. The sound director also oversees incidental music during warm-up, between performances and after competition.

702.05 Announcer

The announcer’s job is to entertain the spectators and inform them about the competition. During competition, the announcer’s primary responsibilities include introducing each team, making requested time announcements, and being entertaining between performances.

702.06 Timer

The timer operates a stopwatch that keeps the official time of a routine. Sometimes the pool director acts as the timer.

702.07 Statistician

The statistician tabulates scores and submits them to the pool director, category judge or head judge. Sometimes the pool director acts as statistician.

703. EVENT PROGRESSIONS

(Secton 703 updated April 2008 by the FPA Board)

The event progression for the tournament determines how many teams advance to the next round. When there is more than one pool, an equal number of teams advances from each pool. If four teams advance from each pool, the four teams with the highest score in Pool A advance, and the four teams with the highest scores in Pool B advance. Scores are never compared between teams from Pool A and teams from Pool B. Ties are broken within a pool to determine advancement to the next round.

All choices of playing order and subsequent round seedings are based on results from the previous round, with ties broken based on Quarterfinal Round seeding.

703.01 Maximum Number of Teams

No more than 64 teams may compete in any division at the FPA World Championships. If more than 64 teams register, the top 56 teams according to world rankings seeding are eligible to compete. The tournament director, in consultation with the FPA Competition Director, may award up to eight wildcards for the remaining competition positions. If less than eight wildcards are awarded, the 64-team field is filled by the teams with the next highest world rankings seeding.

Baseline Number of Teams In Final

 

The number of rounds, number of pools and number of teams in the final depend on the number of entrants. The baseline number of finals teams is as follows:

Open Pairs: 8

Open Co-op: 6

Mixed Pairs: 6

Women: 4

The size of the final may only be expanded according to the number of teams entered in the category. Consult sections 703.03 – 703.10 for more information.

703.03 Fields of 2-8 Teams

 

All teams compete in one pool.

At a major championship with 2-8 teams, there should be two rounds, schedule-permitting.

 

If the number of teams does not exceed the number of finals teams, the first round is used as a seeding round. Results from the first round determine playing order in the finals.

 

If the number of teams exceeds the number of finals teams, the first round determines which teams advance to the finals and their playing order in the finals.

 

Fields of 9-16 Teams

 

If there are more than 12 Women’s teams, the Women’s final expands to six teams.

Rounds of Competition: Semifinal and Final.

 

Routine Length: five minutes for Open Co-op and four minutes for all other categories.

 

Semifinals: Teams compete in two pools. For Open Co-op, Mixed Pairs and Women, the top three teams in each pool advance to the final.

 

Finals: Teams are seeded into one finals pool based on performance in the semifinals.

 

703.05 Fields of 17-23 Teams

 

Rounds of Competition: Quarterfinal, Semifinal and Final.

Size of Finals: Six teams for Open Co-op, Mixed Pairs and Women, and eight teams for Open Pairs.

 

Routine Length: For the quarterfinal round, Open Co-op is four minutes and all other categories are three minutes. Semifinal and finals routine length is five minutes for Open Co- op and four minutes for all other categories.

 

Quarterfinal: Teams are seeded into four quarterfinal pools. Playing order is determined by random draw. Four teams from each pool advance to the semifinals.

 

Semifinal: Teams are seeded into two semifinal pools based on performance in the quarterfinals. Playing order is determined by performance in the Quarterfinals (see section 704.03).

 

Finals: Teams are seeded into one finals pool based on performance in the semifinals.

 

703.06 Fields of 25-32 Teams

 

Rounds of Competition: Quarterfinal, Semifinal, Final

Size of Finals: Eight teams for any category in which at least 25 teams enter.

 

Routine Length: For the quarterfinal round, Open Co-op is four minutes and all other categories are three minutes. Semifinal and finals routine length is five minutes for Open Co- op and four minutes for all other categories.

 

Quarterfinal: Teams are seeded into four quarterfinal pools (see section 704). Playing order is determined by random draw. Four teams from each pool advance to the semifinals.

 

Semifinal: Teams are seeded into two semifinal pools based on performance in the quarterfinals. Playing order is determined by performance in the Quarterfinals (see section 704.03).

 

Finals: Teams are seeded into one finals pool based on performance in the semifinals.

 

703.07 Fields of 33-40 Teams

 

Rounds of Competition: Preliminary (mini), Quarterfinal, Semifinal, Final

Teams seeded 1-24 in the raw (no wildcard) seeding data advance automatically to the Quarterfinal round. Teams seeded 25-40 compete in the Preliminary.

 

Preliminary: Teams compete for four minutes in Open Co-op and three minutes in all other divisions. Teams are seeded into two pools. The top four teams from each pool advance to the quarterfinal round.

 

See Section 703.06 for the event progression of the Quarterfinal, Semifinals and Finals rounds.

 

703.08 Fields of 41-48 Teams

 

Rounds of Competition: Preliminary (full), Quarterfinal, Semifinal, Final

Teams seeded 1-24 in the raw (no wildcard) seeding data advance automatically to the Quarterfinal round. All teams seeded 25-48 compete in the Preliminary.

 

Preliminary: Teams compete for four minutes in Open Co-op and three minutes in all other divisions. Teams are seeded into four pools. Playing order is determined by random draw. The top two teams from each pool advance to the Quarterfinal round.

 

See Section 703.06 for the event progression of the Quarterfinal, Semifinals and Finals rounds.

 

703.09 Fields of 49-56 Teams

 

Rounds of Competition: Qualification (mini), Preliminary, Quarterfinal, Semifinal, Final

Teams seeded 1-24 in the raw (no wildcard) seeding data advance automatically Quarterfinal round. Teams seeded 25-40 advance automatically to the Preliminary round. Teams seeded 41-56 compete in the Mini Pre-Qualifier.

 

Qualification: Teams compete for four minutes in Open Co-op and three minutes in all other divisions. Teams are seeded into two pools. Playing order is determined by random draw. The top four teams from each pool advance to the Qualifier round.

 

See Section 703.08 for the event progression of the Preliminary round.

 

See Section 703.06 for the event progression of the Quarterfinal, Semifinals and Finals rounds.

 

703.10 Fields of 57-64 Teams

 

Rounds of Competition: Qualification (full), Preliminary, Quarterfinal, Semifinal, Final

Teams seeded 1-24 in the raw (no wildcard) seeding data advance automatically Quarterfinal round. Teams seeded 25-40 advance automatically to the Preliminary round. Teams seeded 41-64 compete in the Mini Pre-Qualifier.

 

Qualification: Teams compete for four minutes in Open Co-op and three minutes in all other divisions. Teams are seeded into four pools. Playing order is determined by random draw. The top two teams from each pool advance to the Qualifier round.

 

See Section 703.08 for the event progression of the Preliminary round.

 

See Section 703.06 for the event progression of the Quarterfinal, Semifinals and Finals rounds.

 

 

704. SEEDING AND POOLS

704.01 Registration and Sign-Up

The tournament director will set a deadline by which all players must register for play. The tournament director will set a deadline by which all players will declare their teams.

For the FPA World Championships, the deadline for registration and team sign-up shall be no later than midnight of the day before competition in the category begins.

704.02 Seeding and Formation of Pools

Once the team sign-up deadline has passed, the Head Judge seeds the teams, splits teams into pools if necessary and determines the judging panels. The primary goal in setting up playing pools is to fit the teams into pools that are balanced.

Use the following checklist to set up Preliminary pools:

1. Determine the number of pools

2. Create Raw Seeding List

3. Allocate Provisional Wild cards

4. Create a Raw Seeding List

5. Finalize Wild cards and create Official Seeding List

6. Determine playing order

7. Post provisional pool assignments

8. Respond to player comments

9. Post final pool assignments

A. Determine The Number of Pools. The number of pools is determined by the total number of teams and available space. Each pool should contain no more than eight teams. Use the following tests for determining how many pools in your competition:

(1) There are eight or fewer teams and there are enough qualified judges…..Use one pool.

(2) There are eight or fewer teams but not enough qualified judges…….Use two pools.

(3) There are between nine and sixteen teams….Use two pools.

(4) There are 17-24 teams….Use four pools. Three pools is an option

(5) There are 20 ore more teams….Use four pools.

B. Create Raw Seeding List Using FPA Rankings

(1) Get The FPA Rankings List (www.shrednow.com/rankings/). There are two monthly rankings lists: Open and Women. If the current list is not found, contact Arthur Coddington or an FPA Board member for the most recent list.

(2) Find Ranking Points For Each Player. Find the number of FPA Ranking Points for each entrant. For Open categories, get the ranking points from the Open Rankings list. For Women’s categories, get the ranking points from the Women’s Rankings list. For Mixed Pairs, the male teammate’s points come from the Open Rankings, and the female teammate’s points come from the Women’s Rankings. Add the FPA Ranking Points for each team member to get the team’s Seeding Score.

(a) Open Format Competitions. If the number of players on a team is not standard throughout a category (for instance, pairs teams competing against three-person teams), the Seeding Score is the total ranking points for the team divided by the number of players on a team.

(3). Order the teams by Seeding Score. Create the Raw Seeding List by ordering the teams by Seeding Score. The team with the highest Seeding Score is the top seed. The team with the lowest Seeding Score is the low seed.

C. Allot Provisional Wild cards

A team may be moved higher on the seeding list by using a Wildcard. A Wildcard may not be used to move a team down. Follow these steps to change the pool assignments by awarding up to three (3) Wild cards:

A wildcard is most often used when the FPA Ranking of at least one member of a team is lower than he/she deserves. The Head Judge evaluates using criteria such as the preparation and strength of each team, the reason a low-ranked team has not competed (for instance, injury), and whether the team is the defending champion in that event.

The Head Judge may award provisional Wild cards to underrated teams before the Rough Draft Pools are created, but he/she should be mindful that sometimes the teams most deserving of Wild cards are not obvious until the Rough Draft Pools step is completed.

D. Create Rough Pools

Create pools based on the Raw Seeding List. Diagrams for the assignment of teams into pools are above. Start by putting the top seed in the top box of the A pool then move to the right across the grid. When you have filled the rightmost spot, move down to the next row of boxes and continue assigning teams in a zigzag pattern until you run out of teams.

E. Allot Wild cards and Create Official Seeding List

(1) Evaluate whether the pools seem balanced. One method to check this is to mentally split the teams into contenders, dark horses and teams that may be eliminated. By doing this, you can decide whether there are a balanced number of each caliber team in each pool. If pools are unbalanced, adjust the Provisional Wild cards and award any unused Wild cards to balance the pools.

(2) Re-evaluate. Have the Wild cards made the seeding more fair and the pools more balanced? Focus on how the Wild cards impact the makeup of the Final Pool Assignments. It is more important to have balanced pools than to seed teams exactly where they should be. There is compromise involved, and if the pools are balanced as much as possible, all teams will have a fair opportunity to advance.

(3) Official Seeding List. The Official Seeding List is complete after Wild cards have been awarded.

F. Determine Playing Order

(1) First Round of Three Rounds. In a three round competition, the order of play in the first round is Random. Draw teams randomly to determine playing order.

(2) First Round of Two Rounds. In a two round competition, the order of play in the first round is based on seeding. The low seeds play first and the high seeds play last.

(3) Subsequent Rounds/Earned Playing Order. Earned Playing Order is used to determine the order of play for all rounds after the first round. The top teams from the previous round get to choose their playing positions. The first place qualifiers from the previous round get first choice of playing position. Among the first place qualifiers, the team with the higher seeding on the Official Seeding List gets first choice. The same procedure is repeated with the second place teams and so on until all playing positions are filled.

G. Post provisional pool assignments

The Head Judge must post the provisional pool assignments and playing order for player review before the scheduled start of play for the day. The FPA recommends posting each category’s provisional pool assignments at least one hour the category’s rounds start. Players must have a reasonable time to review the pool assignments and playing order. Any comments about pool assignments or playing order must be made to the Head Judge or his designated representative during the review period.

H. Respond to player comments

The Head Judge will then consider each comment and determine whether seeding, pool assignments or playing order need to be adjusted. The Head Judge is encouraged to communicate with his Category Judge, the Tournament Director, FPA representatives and players to come to the most objective and fair decisions on changes.

I. Announce final pool assignments

The Head Judge posts the final pool assignments and playing order.

 

704.03 Creating Pools After The First Round

A. Revised Seeding List. To determine pool assignments for all rounds after the first round, create a Revised Seeding List. List the preliminary round pool winners according to their rank on the Official Seeding List. The same procedure is used to seed the second place teams and so on until all advancing teams are seeded. This Revised Seeding List is only used to put teams into pools. It does not affect the Official Seeding List.

B. Create Pools. Using the Revised Seeding List, place teams into pools using the instructions in section 704.02D. If the pools are uneven, three wild cards may again be used to switch teams between pools. These wild cards do not affect the Official Seeding List.

C. Playing Order. After the teams have been placed into pools, determine playing order using Earned Playing Order.

 

705 JUDGING PANELS

There are three judging categories (Difficulty, Artistic Impression, Execution) with a panel of 3-5 judges assigned to each. Scores from all judges are added together to produce a final overall score for each team. The Execution duties may optionally be performed by either Difficulty or Artistic Impression judges.

705.01 Determine the Size of the Judging Panel

Based on the number of available, qualified judges, the judging panel may be comprised of six to fifteen people. Option C is the most commonly used judging panel.

A. Fifteen Judges. Five Artistic Impression (A.I.) judges, five Difficulty judges, and five Execution judges constitute the panel. The high and low judge’s score from each category will be dropped, with the remaining nine scores being added for a team’s total score.

B. Ten Judges. Five A.I. judges and five Difficulty judges constitute the panel, with any five judges from either category recording Execution. The high and low judge’s score from each category will be dropped, with the remaining nine scores being added for a team’s total score.

C. Nine Judges. Three A.I. judges, three Difficulty judges, and three Execution judges constitute the panel, with all nine scores being added for a team’s total score.

D. Eight Judges. Four A.I. judges and four Difficulty judges constitute the panel, with any four judges from either category recording Execution. All twelve scores are added for a team’s total.

E. Six Judges. Three A.I. judges and three Difficulty judges constitute the panel, with any three judges, based on their judging confidence level, from either category recording Execution simultaneously with their assigned category. All nine scores are added for a team’s total score.

705.02 Who Are The Judges?

A. Players Judge Each Other. At most competitions, players judge one another. Players who have been eliminated, players in the opposing pools or qualified non-entered players are most often recruited for judging panels. The Head Judge should give judging assignments to as many competitors as possible during preliminary rounds to guarantee that all players have practiced judging for later rounds.

B. Non-player Judges. Qualified, non-player judges may be hired or used on a volunteer basis in any round of competition. Judging panels as describe in section 705.01 are still to be used. If the tournament uses non-player judges exclusively in a format other than those described in section 705.01, a panel of no fewer than three judges is recommended.

705.03. Creating Judging Panels

A. Preparation. Judging assignments should be determined and posted the night before a round when possible. If possible, judging assignments for the next day should be posted for players at the tournament site before the end of the playing day.

B. List The Available Judges. In order to create a judging panel, first determine who the available judges are. All entered players are required to make themselves available to judge in the category in which they are entered.

C. Priority In Assigning Judges. Unless there are non-player judges, the first judges to be considered for a judging panel should be those entered in the category that is being judged. For instance, those entered in Mixed Pairs should considered for a Mixed Pairs judging panel before Open Pairs entrants are considered.

D. Assign Judges. Determine who the most qualified and reliably non-biased judges are in each category. Try to distribute experienced judges across all three categories so inexperienced judges can seek advice if needed. Whenever possible, the Head Judge should not be assigned to judge any component.

E. Conflicts of Interest. Try to avoid conflicts of interest in assigning judges. For instance, whenever possible two teammates should not judge the same category. Similarly, a judge should not be asked to evaluate the performance of his or her significant other.

F. Practice Judges. Players who have not had much judging experience should be encouraged to practice judging when their pool is not playing.  These judges-in-training should sit with the judging panel and be treated just like an official judge except that their score is not counted.

706. ADMINISTRATION OF A COMPETITION

706.01 Music

A. Selection of Music. Players are entitled to choose their own music. The tournament director may set a deadline by which teams must submit their music in an appropriate format (for instance CD or Cassette). If a team fails to submit their music before the deadline, the head judge may substitute another musical selection. The head judge should take care to make this a random selection among songs appropriate for freestyle play in order not to discriminate against the team’s preferences or playing style.

B. Explicit Lyrics. The head judge may reject a music selection due to explicit vocals. A musical selection may not be rejected if it can be broadcast during the day on the radio according to FCC practices.

C. Live Music. A team may play to live, un-amplified acoustic music in competition, provided the consent of the Tournament Director is obtained and tournament procedure is not affected.

706.02 Logistics of Multiple Pools

A. Two Pools. When there are two pools, use the same field and have the pools play one after the other.

B. Four Pools. When there are four pools, use the same field for all pools. Two pools alternate play. For instance, the first team from Pool A plays followed by the first team from pool B followed by the second team from Pool A until all teams have finished play. Pool C judges Pool A, and Pool D judges Pool B and vice versa.

706.03 Administration of a Round

A. Warm-Up. In the absence of a separate warm-up area, players should be given five minutes to warm up on the competition field immediately prior to the beginning of the round.

(1) The Tournament Director may wave warm-up play on the competition field if a comparable warm-up field is provided or if the competition round is in the format of a show or demonstration. If warm-ups are to be limited, players must be informed before the start of the tournament.

(2) Access to the warm-up session should first be given to competitors participating in the next pool. Other competitors may be excluded from this warm-up unless they are directly assisting a pool participant’s warm-up.

B. Introductions. Introductions of teams should be brief and geared toward spectators.

C. Start of Performance and Delays. Music should start as soon as the players have been introduced and are ready to begin. If there is a delay, the team should be informed and be given the option to exit the field.

D. Restart. Restart Due To A Disturbance. If there is a disturbance during a team’s routine (such as children or a dog on the field or a sound system malfunction), the team shall have the option to request a restart of their routine. The responsibility for asking for the restart rests with the team. The request must be made immediately after the disturbance. The Head Judge will determine the validity of the disturbance and the need for a restart. Restarts will not be granted for incorrect time calls.

E. Announcing Scores. Every effort should be made to announce and/or post scores in between performances.

F. Posting Scores. Tabulation forms for each round should be posted for at least thirty minutes as unofficial results, and players should be informed that the results are available for review. Players are responsible for checking the tabulation forms. If requested, the head judge will allow a player to look at judges’ individual scoring sheets. Players must present any questions or protests promptly during this evaluation period. Results may be made official after this evaluation period.

706.04 Scratches.

A. Before A Round.

If a team scratches before the start of a round, they place last in that round. If a team advances to subsequent round and scratches before the beginning of the round, they place last in that round and are not replaced with the next highest finishing team from their qualifying pool.

B. During A Round

If a team scratches after the start of their routine, the judges should score their routine as is, and the team should be placed according to the points awarded by the judges.

706.05 Disqualifications

A. Placement of Teams. If a team is disqualified, they place last in that event. Teams finishing behind a disqualified team in a pool move up one notch. If a team qualifies for a subsequent round and is disqualified before that round begins, the next highest finishing team does not advance to the next round in place of the disqualified team.

B. Grounds for Disqualification

The tournament director or head judge may disqualify a player on the following grounds:

(1) Failure to Judge

(2) Use of Illegal Drugs During The Event

(3) Disturbance of the Tournament

706.06 Tiebreakers

In the event that more than one team has the same final overall score to the nearest tenth of a point, the tie shall be broken.

A. Best 2 of 3 Categories. The team with the higher score in two of the three judging categories (Artistic Impression, Execution, Difficulty) will place higher.

B. Poll of Judges. If this method does not resolve the tie because the teams are tied in one or more components, the following method will be used. Each judge in the tied categories will cast a confidential vote for the team which in his/her opinion won the category he/she judged. The team winning two of three votes in a tied category wins that category. Then, the team that wins two of three categories wins the tie.

EXAMPLE: Team A wins Difficulty, Team B wins Artistic Impression and the teams are tied in Execution. The Execution judges each cast a vote on which team in their opinion played most flawlessly. Team B receives two votes, and Team A receives one. Team B wins Execution. Since Team B wins Execution and Artistic Impression, it wins the tie and is placed higher than Team A.

706.07 Time Penalties

Teams must complete their routines within ten seconds of the routine’s time limit (for instance, the 4-minute mark for a 4-minute routine). The timing for the routine shall be based on the official’s timer unless a visible clock is provided, in which case the visible clock shows the official timing of the routine. The official timing of the routine should start with the first throw or initiation of a move with the disc. Failure to complete the performance within this twenty second window will result in a severe error execution deduction from each Execution judge against the team’s total score.

706.08 Time Announcements

Teams are responsible for keeping track of the elapsed time of their routines. Teams may request time announcements during their routines unless an elapsed-time or time-remaining clock is visible to players on the field,. If such an elapsed time or time-remaining clock is visible to players on the field, the Tournament Director may elect not to allow time announcements.

A. Incorrect Time Calls.   In the absence of a visible clock, players may be given consideration for incorrect or missed time calls. If an incorrect call is given, or if a call is omitted that results in a team finishing too early or too late, the time penalty may be waived. Restarts will not be granted for incorrect time calls.

 

707. JUDGING POLICIES

707.01 Judging Responsibilities

All players must judge when asked to. If a player fails to judge or fails to complete his/her responsibilities as a judge, that player’s teams may be disqualified from all categories at the tournament. The teams will be listed as placing last among all entered teams and will be ineligible for prizes or ranking points for that event. The FPA Board may take further action regarding future competitive eligibility for the player.

707.02 Exemption

A player may be exempted from judging if he/she is unavailable due to illness, pre-existing travel plans or other excuse deemed acceptable by the tournament director. The excuse must be presented to the tournament director in advance of judging assignments for the round and preferably in advance of the start of the tournament.

707.03 Bias

Judges and officials must put aside personal biases to the best of their ability and judge only the components assigned to them.

707.04 When A Judge Does Not Report

If a judge fails to report for a round and no substitute can be found, that judge’s score will be determined by averaging the other acceptable scores for that team in that judging component.

707.05 Reporting Scores

Judges must complete calculations and report scores to the head judge within one minute.

707.06 Absent Judge or Unacceptable Judging Sheet

If a judge is absent or otherwise unwilling or unable to turn in a fair judging sheet, that judge’s score will be the average of the other acceptable scores for that team in that judging component.

707.07 Disqualifying A Judge’s Scores

If a head judge determines that a judge is not fulfilling his/her duties as a judge, that judge’s scores should be thrown out for the round and recalculated by averaging the other acceptable scores for each team in that judging component.

707.08 Communication Among Judges

Judges are encouraged to communicate with each other during performances but are not required to.

707.09 Rounding Of Scores

Judges must round scores to the nearest tenth of a point. For example, 3.44 is rounded to 3.4, and 3.45 is rounded to 3.5.

707.10 Correcting Scores

Judges may not change a score once it is reported to the pool director unless they can prove it was a simple mathematical error. Judges must show the Head Judge or Category Judge the actual math error. If the Head Judge or Category judge determines that the changed score is due to a math error, the change should be allowed.

707.11 Alcohol and Smoking

Drinking of alcoholic beverages and smoking are prohibited at the judging table.

707.12 Presence At Judging Table

Judges must report to the judging table and be seated when called. They are not to leave the judging table without the pool director or head judge’s permission.

 

708. PLAYER EXPECTATIONS

The presentation of all freestyle events is very important to the continued growth and enjoyment of the sport. Sponsors, the community, the Freestyle Players Association, the World Flying Disc Federation and the General Association of International Sports Federations can all be harmed by inappropriate behavior. Therefore, it will not be tolerated.

At any flying disc event or tournament, even non-FPA events, if a player violates the FPAís Player Expectations, engages in disruptive behavior or behavior that endangers the sport, that player is subject to punishment by the FPA according to FPA policy and the FPA bylaws. Simple statements of disagreement with FPA or WFDF policy do not constitute endangerment of the sport.

708.01 Dress Code  Players should present themselves in a sporting athletic fashion. We hope that freestyle disc players will continue to be inventive in their dress, but all in good taste.

708.02 Drugs and Alcohol  These are strictly forbidden on the playing field. Proper liquor permits must be obtained if sales are to be displayed at any event. In all cases, players should avoid intoxication when they are in the public eye at the tournament site.

708.03 Foul Language and Bad Presence.   Players should conduct themselves in a responsible and understanding manner. Excessive displays of anger or displeasure in oneself or others while in the public eye in competitive situations should be avoided.

709. JUDGING SYSTEM

709.01 Difficulty

A. General. Judge what is attempted as well as what is completed. Consider the relative risk of the moves. If a reasonable attempt is made but the disc is dropped, it should receive a slightly lower score than if the player had caught the disc. If the attempt falls far short of completion, the difficulty should be adjusted accordingly.

B. Time Block Scoring. Difficulty is scored in 15-second blocks. Every 15 seconds, a cassette tape will sound “Mark.” Write down one score that reflects both the most difficult moves attempted in the preceding 15 seconds and the total difficulty attempted in that period. Use the whole 0-10 scale. At the end of the time allotted for the routine, the cassette will sound “Time.” Do not consider any risk/difficulty demonstrated after “Time” is called. Cross out the lowest score and add up the rest. Divide by the number of marks added up and round to the nearest tenth.

C. Factors that Determine Risk

1. Consecutive play.  Credit should be given for the difficulty of combining moves, and even more so for combining components.

2. Consecutivity. Moves broken up by pauses or hesitations (THEs) should not be given as much credit as the same moves linked together consecutively.

3. Technical Challenge.   Consider whether the move requires advanced skill in making contact with the disc or requires precise or gentle handling?

4. Physical Challenge.  Consider whether the move requires exceptional control, flexibility or strength. Moves that require the player to be upside down, contorted or restricted should be rewarded under this factor.

5. Duration of the critical moment.   Consider whether the technical and/or physical challenges are increased by slowing down or speeding up the action. The inclusion of blind time and its duration would be one example of a skill covered under this factor.

6. Complexity and timing of co-ops.  Cooperative moves may require significantly more intricacy and timing than the same moves done by one person. Reward the intricacy and timing of cooperative interactions.

709.02 Artistic Impression

A. General. Artistic Impression is the average of 5 subscores: Variety, Teamwork, Music Choreography, Flow/Form, and General Impression. Each receive a score from 0.0-10.0. Flow and Form are each given a score of 0.0-5.0 and added together to make one subscore.

B. Variety. Variety reflects how well a team mixes the different areas of freestyle disc play. The main goal is for the play not to be repetitious. While a routine should have a proper variety to incorporate the different areas of disc play, by no means does the mix need to be equal, as certain moves may not work toward the ultimate goal of a congruent, appealing routine. Judge the routine as a series of ideas. Note whether the team presents a series of unique ideas (a high score) or the same idea over and over (a low score). An idea can be a THROW, a CATCH, a DRAMATIC EVENT involving the disc, or a CONSECUTIVE PORTION of a combination. Focus closely on the play, as repeating the same move with different hands or spins or with an upside down disc is not necessarily repetitive. Similarly, a team playing only clock or counter can still score high. Repetition can be done artistically. The purposeful repetition of a move to make a point is not necessarily repetitious-the first performance of the skill (making the point) is demonstrated with its second performance.

1. Types of Variety

a. Throws.  Variations include use of different throws, grips and hands.

b. Catches. Variations include different catches and different performance of catches (leaping vs. standing; extended vs. condensed; right leg or hand vs. left hand or leg).

c. Disc handling.  Variations include diversity of techniques/modes of action (control moves, intricate body movements, brushing, percussion, speed-flow, angle adjustments, turnovers, etc.) and diversity within modes of action (clock/counter skills, left/right hand skills, slow/fast performance of skills, use of feet or other body part). Consider whether the composition of the combinations throughout the routine is tediously repetitive. Evaluate both the diversity of modes of action and diversity within each mode of action as they impact the routine.

d. Co-ops.  Variations include the disc handling skills evaluated above plus additional factors such as the distance between team members and their mutual restriction to each other. Teams that demonstrate a creative and diverse composition of coops will most likely avoid tedious repetition. The judge should consider the variety of a team’s co-ops in terms of the routine as a whole because a team’s co-ops may be a variation on a theme for artistic reasons.

C. Teamwork. Evaluate the quality and quantity of co-ops and speed-flow segments. Evaluate the quantity both in terms of time spent performing co-ops and speed-flow segments and the sheer number of them.

D. Music Choreography. Evaluate the team’s relationship to the style and content of their music. Do not give a score based on whether or not you like the music. Routines that hit key breaks in the music or that show a well-established relationship to the style and content of the music should be rewarded more than a routine that shows no relationship to the music.

E. Flow/Form. Flow/Form is comprised of two separate 5 point marks – Flow and Form

1. Flow. Evaluate the flow demonstrated by each team throughout their routine. The players should have very little or no break in the flow of their routine. It should be obvious that they know at each stage in the routine what is happening and where they should be. A routine in disarray, or one demonstrating forgetfulness should not be rewarded. Also consider the flow demonstrated in each player’s style. For instance, a smooth transition from catch to throw may be rewarded in this subcategory.

2. Form. Evaluate the extent to which the team incorporates appealing or purposeful body positioning into their play. Reward routines that show care for body positioning in contrast to routines demonstrating haphazard or sloppy body positioning. Take care not to favor one style of form over another. Some components of form to consider, especially during disc work, include arm and leg positioning, good balance, and body line. Judge body line with respect to the player’s body shape. Do not penalize a player for not having a natural body line. One example of the demonstration of form in leg positioning is pointing the toes. Pointed toes are not the only toe position that can be rewarded in this category but they are the most common example of forethought about leg positioning. Other toe positions can also be rewarded if they meet the “appealing or purposeful” definition.

G. General Impression. What did you think of the routine as a whole? Was the team successful in making the Artistic Impression or creating the emotional response they intended? Keep in mind that a team does not have to perform a pleasant or happy routine to be artistically successful.

709.03 Execution

A. General. Evaluate how flawlessly each team performs. Be demanding of excellence, and be consistent. Scoring begins with a full 10 and is reduced as errors are made. Each judge keeps track of Severe, Major, Intermediate and Minor errors. At the end of the routine, add the deductions together then subtract that number from 10.

B. Categories of Deductions. There are four categories of Execution deductions. Below are general guidelines for each deduction category:

1. Severe Error (-.5) Reserved for mistakes that disturb the routine in an extreme way, such as a wild throwaway, a long, embarrassing break in the routine, or an incident that clearly endangers the audience. Judges are cautioned to make a Severe Error deduction only when the audience is clearly endangered, not just when players perform near the audience. Catches near the audience may add to a routine’s excitement without endangering spectators.

2. Major Error (-.3) Each drop in a routine is usually considered a Major Error. It is also possible that a drop may not occur, but the mistake distracted so much from the routine’s flow that it deserves a Major Error deduction. Major stalls in action should receive a mark in the Major Error category. Wild throws may be given this deduction rather than the Severe deduction at the judge’s discretion. Drops “rooted” out smoothly without a break in flow can be reduced to Intermediate or Minor errors.

3. Intermediate Error (-.2) Errors of this degree may cover drops that the player flows through without the need for a save or hesitation. Other pauses like awkward body movements or disruptions in the routine may also be considered Intermediate Errors.

4. Minor Error (-.1) Small but noticeable errors that affect the flow of the routine. This may include unintended disc movement, awkward body control or breaks in continuity.

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